Posts Tagged ‘Riverside Studios’

 

 

18/06/11

When we are thrown into the world of Dunsinane, Macbeth is all but defeated and the battle appears to be won. The soldiers we follow are trained in being a forest, and then thrown into a bloody skirmish. Peace takes hold of Dunsinane, but in Greig‘s adaptation, it isn‘t as simple as that.

Dunsinane follows the English officer, Siward, who seeks to impose order in Scotland after the death of Macbeth and Malcolm’s installation on the throne. He finds peace-keeping in the chaotic tribal run country fraught with hidden pitfalls.

When Siward orders his comrade to “Tell the men we’ll be in Scotland a little longer than expected.”, immediate parallels are drawn between 11th-century Scotland, and the current situation in the Middle East. The struggles faced by Siward, accompanied by an army ill-equipped to deal with the guerilla tactics of the native population, are fascinating to watch. The more the English officers and soldiers attempt to understand Scottish culture and the alien land they have been thrown into, the more hapless their efforts to tame it look.

The problems of negotiating a foreign land and its people are also wittily portrayed from the point of view of the common soldier, with one boys letters to his mother back home providing moments on levity and a stark insight into the morale of the troops.

This is definitely a character piece, and the performances are amazing. I first came across Jonny Phillips playing Iago at Riverside Studio’s – it was this performance that first ignited my passion for Shakespeare, so it was a delight to see him tackle this equally meaty role. He is glorious as Siward, conveying the bubbling frustration and confusion beneath his grizzled surface, while constantly trying to maintain his honour and principles.

Siobhan Redmond is superb as the formidable Gruach, the proud queen seeking to restore her son to the throne. While her accent is a little odd at times (which I find strange considering she is actually Scottish), she leaves the audience in no doubt that, while she is prisoner, she is the person who possesses the real power in Scotland.

In contrast to this, Brian Ferguson’s deadpan Malcolm is just hilarious. Sporting an oversized crown, his mannerisms and speech let the audience know immediately that he is not the man to unite the clans of Scotland, indeed, he seems to actively hate Scotland, and all the clan leaders to boot! He becomes a scene-stealer in any scene he finds himself in, peppering the otherwise depressing situation with sardonic witticisms that skewer Anglo-Scottish behaviour and highlight the futility of the situation.

The stage itself is wonderfully simple: a large Celtic cross perches on some stone steps, overlooking a rocky layered stage. This simplistic design allows for the fast pace we see throughout, with soldiers running through the Swan Theatre as though the battle is taking place just beyond the walls of the theatre. Live music is also handled brilliantly, with some very beautiful Celtic singing framing a lot of the action.

David Grieg’s Shakespearean sequel, expertly directed by Roxanna Silbert, is an outstanding addition to the RSC’s season. At 2 hours 30 minutes long, they appear to have cut a lot from the daunting 3 hour run time that many complained about at Hampstead Theatre; this seems to have created a much slicker play. The timing throughout this piece is wonderful, tripping delicately between comedy, tragedy and satire with the greatest of ease.

In a speech delivered cautiously by Malcolm, we come to realise that peace is not a default situation in this Scotland, but rather a rare freak occurrence, like a calm sea before the waves come. It is a depressing, but beautiful allegory, and one that demonstrates the futility of modern conflicts much more simply than any news report ever could.